Fast Partition Learning for Partially Observed Graphs


Fast Partition Learning for Partially Observed Graphs – Graph search is a fundamental problem in computational biology, where a goal is to find the best graph to search on the given graph, which is a difficult task given that the graph is known to be highly non-differentiable. A well-known approach, which we refer to as graph search, is shown to be successful on graphs on which the most significant nodes are non-differentiable. However, it does not generalize to graphs on which the most significant nodes are non-differentiable, and vice versa. We present a novel algorithm for optimizing the optimality of this problem, which combines a set of non-differentiable graphs, and a graph search algorithm, which is shown safe against unknown non-differentiable graphs.

In many recent works there has been a growing interest in learning graphical models from data. In the most general case of a data point, the model is a function of its underlying data. However, most prior works typically focus on the data point’s properties for its predictive capability. Most earlier work has simply used data from a given distribution and the probability that one sample is positive. This assumption ignores the presence of some other characteristic of the distribution (e.g., Gaussian processes). To address this problem, we propose to learn a Gaussian process model from data. Through learning a Gaussian process model it can find relevant functions for its predictive capability. In particular, when Gaussian processes are used for predicting the outcome of multiple experiments, the model can generalize well and have similar predictive ability. Our empirical results demonstrate that if a Gaussian process model is learned from data, it can outperform more traditional predictive models such as Gaussian processes.

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Fast Partition Learning for Partially Observed Graphs

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  • Stochastic Lifted Bayesian Networks

    On the Existence of a Sample Mean in Gaussian Process Models with a Non-negative FactorizerIn many recent works there has been a growing interest in learning graphical models from data. In the most general case of a data point, the model is a function of its underlying data. However, most prior works typically focus on the data point’s properties for its predictive capability. Most earlier work has simply used data from a given distribution and the probability that one sample is positive. This assumption ignores the presence of some other characteristic of the distribution (e.g., Gaussian processes). To address this problem, we propose to learn a Gaussian process model from data. Through learning a Gaussian process model it can find relevant functions for its predictive capability. In particular, when Gaussian processes are used for predicting the outcome of multiple experiments, the model can generalize well and have similar predictive ability. Our empirical results demonstrate that if a Gaussian process model is learned from data, it can outperform more traditional predictive models such as Gaussian processes.


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